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Album of the Week 16-20 December ‐ Worldwide FM
  • Album of the Week 16-20 December

    Various Artists – ‘Mogadisco – Dancing Mogadishu (1972 – 1991) [Analog Africa] Worldwide FM Morning Mari’s album of the week is Analog Africa‘s “Various Artists – ‘Mogadisco – Dancing Mogadishu (1972 – 1991)“. In November 2016 Analog Africa founder Samy Ben Redjeb headed to Somalia’s capital Mogadishu. Rifling through piles of cassettes and listening to…

    Various Artists – ‘Mogadisco – Dancing Mogadishu (1972 – 1991) [Analog Africa]

    Worldwide FM Morning Mari’s album of the week is Analog Africa‘s “Various Artists – ‘Mogadisco – Dancing Mogadishu (1972 – 1991)“.

    In November 2016 Analog Africa founder Samy Ben Redjeb headed to Somalia’s capital Mogadishu. Rifling through piles of cassettes and listening to reel-to-reel tapes in the dusty archives of Radio Mogadishu, Samy found music that “swam against the current”. Analog Africa are now presenting this collection of previously unreleased Somali Funk and more.

    Welcome to the dancefloors of ‘Mogadisco’.

    Track-listing:

    1. “Daradaa Muxibo (Because of you Muxibo)” -Dur-Dur Band 5:20 (1991)
    2. “Hab Isii (Hug Me)” -Omar Shooli 5:36 (1986)
    3. “Check Up My Head” -Mukhtar Ramadan Iidi 5:51 (1988)
    4. “Geesiyada Halgamayow (Brave Fighters)” -Bakaka Band 5:50 (1984)
    5. “Waakaa Helaa (I like you)” -Fadumo Qassim & Shareero Band 6:22 (1972)
    6. “Sirmaqabe (No Secrets)” -Iftin Band 6:29 (1985)
    7. “Baayo (Hey Woman)” -Mukhtar Ramadan Iidi5:36 (1986)
    8. “Hoobeya (Somali traditional chant)” -Shimaali & killer 5:12 (1990)
    9. “Shaleedayaa (By Myself)” -Dur-Dur Band 3:44 (1991)
    10. “Ladaney (Woman’s Name)” -Dur-Dur Band 5:06 (1991)
    11. “Gobonimada Jira (Choose Freedom)” -Bakaka Band 8:34 (1984)
    12. “Ii Ooy Aniga (Cry For Me)” -Iftin Band 3:37 (1985)
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  • Album of the Week 9-13 December

    Jonny Dillon – Songs For A One​-​String Guitar [All City] Worldwide FM’s album of the week is Jonny Dillon‘s “Songs For A One​-​String Guitar”, out on All City Records from Dublin. Songs For A One-String Guitar is the debut instrumental acoustic guitar LP from Jonny Dillon. Better known for his analogue electronic music productions and…

    Jonny Dillon – Songs For A One​-​String Guitar [All City]

    Worldwide FM’s album of the week is Jonny Dillon‘s “Songs For A One​-​String Guitar”, out on All City Records from Dublin.

    Songs For A One-String Guitar is the debut instrumental acoustic guitar LP from Jonny Dillon. Better known for his analogue electronic music productions and all-hardware live sets under the ‘Automatic Tasty’ moniker [Lunar Disko, CPU, Wrong Island], Jonny’s records (bearing heavy acid and electro influences), along with live appearances at venues like Berlin’s Panorama Bar and Kiev’s Closer belie the fact that he has been quietly exploring the musical landscape of the guitar for nearly twenty years.

    .
    Recorded as a series of sketches over the last 10 years, Songs For A One-String Guitar represents a snapshot taken over a long exposure; one individual’s private response to a variety of currents and inspirations both musical and emotional. While informed in large measure by the world of Irish traditional music and song (of Sweeney’s Men, Planxty and Seán Garvey) along with that of primitivism and the American Spiritual (of John Fahey, Hank Williams and Mississippi John Hurt) these songs are equally a personal attempt to give expression to an inner landscape, from the experience of sorrow and loss to the promise of redemption and renewal.

    .
    Songs For A One-String Guitar may seem to represent a departure for those who know Dillon for his electronic productions alone, though the reality is that these songs merely represent a new opening onto an old landscape; they are an invitation to more fully share in one individual’s yearning to find meaning through creative expression. “These songs are very personal to me, so there’s a certain nervousness in my seeing them released. I hope that they prove of some use, and that they do some small good to those who hear them.”

     

    Tracklist:

    1. Turning Invisible In An Imaginary Rose Garden One Evening 03:46
    2. Amhrán An Dreoilín 03:10
    3. Jonny Tries To Catch A Pomegranate 04:10
    4. The Road To Your Door 02:36
    5. Requiem For Joe Dillon / Light A Penny Candle 06:56
    6. Somebody Else’s Blues 02:38
    7. God Bless Little Peter 03:39
    8. That Go To Sleep Rag 02:39
    9. Mad Sweeney’s Day Off 02:50
    10. Again, But With Feeling This Time 04:17
    11. Start Again (Carry On) 02:54

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  • Album of the Week 2-6 December

    Alogte Oho and his Sounds Of Joy
 – Mam Yinne Wa [Philophon] Worldwide FM’s album of the week is Alogte Oho and his Sounds Of Joy‘s “Mam Yinne Wa“, out on Philophon Records. At first, Alogte Oho’s career was moving along in relatively small steps. Neither his first locally released cassette, put out in 2007…

    Alogte Oho and his Sounds Of Joy
 – Mam Yinne Wa [Philophon]

    Worldwide FM’s album of the week is Alogte Oho and his Sounds Of Joy‘s “Mam Yinne Wa“, out on Philophon Records.

    At first, Alogte Oho’s career was moving along in relatively small steps. Neither his first locally released cassette, put out in 2007 when he had just turned twenty one, or his 2010 follow up album, had yielded the successes he yearned for. As a consequence he became desperate to make a living through music and was close to giving up when his life took a dramatic turn.

    One day, Oho was riding his motorbike through the chaotic traffic of Ghana’s capital Accra and daydreaming about the possibilities better future. While distracted, he was suddenly hit by a car and suffered serious injuries, almost losing his life. The accident left him confined to hospital for about two months. After the shock was gone, he was lieing in his hospital bed when he became aware of a divine protection that had kept him alive. His first clear thought was ‘Mam Yinne Wa’ (God, You Love Me So). He suddenly started to hum a melody and the song ‘Mam Yinne Wa’ was born.

    The first thing he did once he had fully recovered with a new motivation to continue with music, was to run to the studio to record his new song. It instantly became a big hit among his people, the Frafra, and suddenly Alogte was the top Frafra-Gospel artist.

    ‘Mam Yinne Wa’ is also the title of Alogte’s first debut internationally released album on Philophon. As always, Alogte is accompanied his cheerful choir, The Sounds of Joy.

    The album opens up with a newly recorded version of ‘Mam Yinne Wa’, which saw a 7“ release on Philophon back in 2016 and helped Alogte become an internationally recognised artist.

    Over the course of nine tracks, Oho takes the listener on a journey to the very unique world of Frafra-Gospel. The songs demonstrates just how he came to be such a universally loved artist in his hometown of Bolgatanga in northern Ghana. Lilting from low slung reggae based numbers like ‘Alema Timba’ and ‘La Ta’aba’ to more upbeat songs like ‘Sandana Fom’ and the album’s title track, which are played in traditional local rhythms. Throughout the album Oho and his Sounds of Joy deliver the Lord’s gospel in soothing Frafra tones.

    Berlin-based Philophon founder Max Weissenfeldt handles the arrangement and production duties on the album. An extensive cast of mainly German musicians delicately compliment Oho and his Sounds of Joy’s life affirming vocal performances. Weissenfeldt’s production and arrangement, while musically intricate and complex, leaves the vocalists with plenty of room to clearly deliver Oho’s Frafra gospel.

    The album stays well and truly grounded in the Ghanaian (more specifically, Frafra) musical heritage while sounding remarkably contemporary, managing to make delicate flute lines sound right at home next to wildly bleeping synthesizers.

    Tracklist:

    A1 Mam Yinne Wa
    A2 Allema Timba
    A3 Sandana Fom
    A4 Zota Yinne
    B1 Fom Se Mam
    B2 Yu Ya Yumma
    B3 Ma’lgo
    B4 La Ta’ba
    B5 Sala An Songa

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  • Random Access: Live At Tate Modern

    Join Worldwide FM for a very special evening at Tate Modern from 6pm, where Global Roots and a host of special guests respond to the brilliant Nam Jun Paik exhibition with Random Access, a collaboration with afro-electronic music producer Ekiti Sound, digital art specialists James Harford (Beej) and Sabina Covarrubias to reveal a data-generated audio…

    Join Worldwide FM for a very special evening at Tate Modern from 6pm, where Global Roots and a host of special guests respond to the brilliant Nam Jun Paik exhibition with Random Access, a collaboration with afro-electronic music producer Ekiti Sound, digital art specialists James Harford (Beej) and Sabina Covarrubias to reveal a data-generated audio visual experiment. You can expect live talks during the event from DADA.Art, MOCDA, Robbie Barrat, Dr Holly Rogers and Rebecca Ubuntu.

    Listeners can get involved from 3pm when Global Roots hosts a live radio show from the Tate Modern previewing and contextualising Random Access with music and guests.

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  • Album of the Week 25-29 November

    Michael Kiwanuka – KIWANUKA [Polydor Records] Our album of the week is Michael Kiwanuka‘s critically acclaimed 3rd album “KIWANUKA” out on Polydor Records along with the announcement of his new tour dates. The self-titled record usually marks a definable phase of a musician’s career; an embrace of personal mythology, perhaps, or merely a shift to…

    Michael Kiwanuka – KIWANUKA [Polydor Records]

    Our album of the week is Michael Kiwanuka‘s critically acclaimed 3rd album “KIWANUKA” out on Polydor Records along with the announcement of his new tour dates.

    The self-titled record usually marks a definable phase of a musician’s career; an embrace of personal mythology, perhaps, or merely a shift to ‘take me as I am’ straightforwardness. But “Kiwanuka”, the single eponymous word that heralds Michael Kiwanuka’s third album, holds a resonant, complex significance. It signals, for one thing, a swift, pointed rejection of the stage personas that artists have historically donned as both a freeing creative mask and a protective shield. It is an act of cultural affirmation and self-acceptance: a young British-African, contemplating the continued struggle for racial equality, and proudly celebrating the Ugandan name his old teachers in Muswell Hill would struggle to pronounce. It is a nod to a suite of arresting, ambitious soul songs that – while they deftly recall the funkified epics of artists as varied as Gil Scot-Heron, Fela Kuti, Bobby Womack and Kendrick Lamar – cement the singular, supremely confident sound that made 2016’s Love & Hate such an undeniable step up.

    Now, following ‘Money’ – the lauded summer single collaboration with Tom Misch – and a sunset Park Stage set that was the talk of Glastonbury 2019, the long-awaited follow-up to that record can be announced. And “Kiwanuka”, like its creator, contains multitudes; it offers both the triumphal, grin-widening empowerment of opener ‘You Ain’t the Problem’ and the ruminative, candlelit intimacy of ‘Solid Ground’. It looks inward and out, across widescreen sonic landscapes constructed in recording studios in London, Los Angeles and New York, and provides a sumptuous showcase for the honey-poured mahogany of Kiwanuka’s voice. It skilfully crosses the streams of the personal and the political. No other name would really have done.

    In many ways this self-possession is a direct consequence of Love & Hate. That record added an unexpected Mayfieldian groove and scope to to the scuffed, ‘70s-infused mellowness of Home Again, Kiwanuka’s Mercury-nominated 2012 debut. Album number two, of course, got its own place on the Mercury shortlist (not to mention a No 1 chart position, a Brit Award-nomination and the wide cultural blast radius afforded by songs that featured on shows like The Get Down, When They See Us and, most notably, HBO’s Emmy-winning Big Little Lies).

    “Kiwanuka” marks a reunion of the team that conjured ’s acclaimed, pulsing soulscape – namely Gnarls Barkley hit whisperer Brian ‘Danger Mouse’ Burton and British hip hop producer Inflo – and it actually began life not long after the 32-year-old had finished touring its predecessor. Early Los Angeles sessions – in May, 2017 – proved wildly productive. Maybe, in fact, too productive. The trio had sketched out around eight songs – including lyricless, early versions of ‘You Ain’t the Problem’ and the spine-tingling, wintry ballad ‘Piano Joint (This Kind of Love)’ – at such a breathless gallop that Kiwanuka felt some of his old doubts and insecurities creep back. “It was all so fast,” he reasons. “I remember having a conversation with Danger Mouse where I even asked, ‘Is this my album?’” He chuckles at the memory. “That was the lack of self-belief and me beating myself up.”

    An extended recess was called and, when the team fully reconvened in New York in November 2018, Kiwanuka returned to the project with a new vigour, confidence and a clear sense of this new record’s themes and immersive, sonic textures. It was here that he actualised the lyrically knotty, comforting message of ‘You Ain’t the Problem’ (“It almost made me feel like being a rapper,” he grins); where he turned ‘Hero’ into a shape-shifting, thunderously percussive mini-movie, partly inspired by slain civil rights activist Fred Hampton; here that he crafted the hazy refrain – “” – that allied with Danger Mouse’s rhythm guitar playing to give psych-gospel highlight ‘I’ve Been Dazed’ its eerie, hypnotic power.

    “We had three weeks and every day I would just do this half hour walk from my hotel by the Brooklyn Bridge to the studio in Red Hook, listening to backing tracks and scribbling lyrics on hotel paper or in my little scrapbook,” he says, more than a little wistfully. “It felt like being 15. And that excitement and childish imagination really helped me forget that it was a scary process.” This youthful sense of play also led to the invocation of some, possibly surprising, tonal influences from Kiwanuka’s childhood as a skater kid who loved Nirvana and Green Day as much as Outkast and Lauryn Hill. Using the cinematic skits and interludes of a record like by The Fugees as a springboard, Kiwanuka wondered if the horn-drenched grandeur of previous lengthy songs like ‘Love & Hate’ and ‘Father’s Child’ could be intensified and transformed into something even more atmospheric, more immersive.

    The result is the unhurried, auterish poise that may be one of “Kiwanuka”’s most striking features. ‘Piano Joint (This Kind of Love) Intro’ sets the scene with windblown harmonies and a rumbling, canyon-deep baritone to rival Isaac Hayes (it’s actually Kiwanuka, detuned). ‘Another Human Being’ features a jolting gun shot and a quote taken from a participant in the Civil Rights ‘sit-in’ protests that swept through North Carolina in 1960 (‘Interlude (Living All the People)’ also features the voice of congressman and activist John Lewis). ‘Hard To Say Goodbye’ is a dawnlit, 7 minute opus that Kiwanuka garnished with the sampled sound of twittering birds. “I was really influenced by the vividness of something like ,” he explains, about the desire to create such a rich, inhabitable world.

    And he even allowed himself to be coaxed towards stretches of musical terrain that he would never have ordinarily explored. When Danger Mouse first started working towards the skipping, almost ‘80s rhythm of ‘Final Days’ – about as far from “Home Again”’s retro soul as this new record gets – Kiwanuka was hesitant. “It’s kind of spacey so I took a lot of convincing,” he admits. “But we went the whole hog with it and it’s one of my favourite songs now.”

    It tells its own story that Kiwanuka – who came up in the pub rooms of London’s acoustic scene before winning the BBC’s Sound Of 2012 poll – is now so happily embracing musical touchstones and styles that may have once seemed contradictory. The revelatory, confessional core of ‘Black Man in a White World’ (which grappled with identity and Kiwanuka’s status in communities where he was conspicuously the only ethnic minority) has evolved into something a little more certain. Now, Kiwanuka’s reengagement with his Ugandan heritage (he hopes, he notes, to play some shows there soon) manifests in skittering Afrobeat drums and guitar lines that he hopes possess “the feeling of a Fela track”.

    “Kiwanuka” solidifies one of British music’s more remarkable career progressions. The man behind it has put his immense natural gifts to work in an album that wields difficult subjects – black identity, violence, self-doubt – with a light touch and a dramatist’s sense of mood, space and atmosphere. “The things that end up being enjoyed are often things you want to hide,” he says, quietly. “But obviously that’s the stuff that makes us connect.” Telling people who you are – truly, unabashedly showing yourself – has never sounded more thrilling.

    Tracklist:

    1. You Ain’t the Problem
    2. Rolling
    3. I’ve Been Dazed
    4. Piano Joint (This Kind of Love) [Intro]
    5. Piano Joint (This Kind of Love)
    6. Another Human Being
    7. Living In Denial
    8. Hero (Intro)
    9. Hero
    10. Hard to Say Goodbye
    11. Final Days
    12. Interlude (Loving the People)
    13. Solid Ground
    14. Light

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  • Album of the Week: 18-22 November

    WAQWAQ KINGDOM – ESSAKA HOISA [PHANTOM LIMB] Our album of the week is WaqWaq Kingdom‘s ‘Essaka Hoisa‘ out on Phantom Limb on the 15th of November. Essaka Hoisa, the thrilling, brand new LP of “minyo footwork” by Japanese musicians Shige Ishihara (DJ Scotch Egg / Seefeel) and Kiki Hitomi (of King Midas Sound) under their…

    WAQWAQ KINGDOM – ESSAKA HOISA [PHANTOM LIMB]

    Our album of the week is WaqWaq Kingdom‘s ‘Essaka Hoisa‘ out on Phantom Limb on the 15th of November.

    Essaka Hoisa, the thrilling, brand new LP of “minyo footwork” by Japanese musicians Shige Ishihara (DJ Scotch Egg / Seefeel) and Kiki Hitomi (of King Midas Sound) under their WaqWaq Kingdom guise lands in November 2019 on Phantom Limb.

    Uniquely omnivorous in their approach, WaqWaq Kingdom’s endless range of stylistic adventures sees them draw lines between traditional Japanese and contemporary electronic, between Jamaican dancehall and 8-bit techno, between African polyrhythms and experimental music, with plenty more helping to colour a powerful, vibrant palette. This new record – after 2017’s debut Shinsekai – is the first under the new line-up of Hitomi and Ishihara, as former drummer Andrea Belfi leaves the band for his own projects. This shift in personnel and dynamic has allowed Hitomi’s vocal delivery and Ishihara’s production to explore even deeper new ground, borrowing infinitesimally small snippets of sound and style to craft a singular hotpot of musics. From opener “Mum Tells Me” (written after Kiki sadly lost both her parents in a short period of time) and its Shinto bells and Afro-trap percussion, to “Itakadakimasu” and its reproach of human greed via twisted Cubo-Cumbia beats, Essaka Hoisa rarely stays in one place at a time.

    Conceptually, Essaka Hoisa draws influence and imagery from traditional Japanese history and mythology. The title is taken from the cry of kago carriers – seen as Kiki and Shige on Kiki’s illustration for the record sleeve – two people carrying ruling-class or religious dignitaries over great distances. The shout Essaka Hoisa was said to lift the carriers’ spirits and strengthen their unity. In her lyrics, Kiki uses this imagery to explore our own reflective burden – experiencing life without an understanding of its meaning. Carrying hardship, sadness, pain and difficulty like a kago carrier, shouting essaka hoisa to get through the struggle. “We keep on going and shouting Essaka Hoisa together with partners, our kin, friends and people that we walk together and carrying on our life with laughter and tears,” Kiki writes. “No matter what, I am carrying on my life. I won’t give up and keep on going, keep on making, keep on learning with hollering the word Essaka Hoisa.”

    Shigeru Ishihara – aka DJ Scotch Egg – has been a distinctive alien orbiting the dance music galaxy for over a decade, releasing radiantly unpredictable solo records through Lightning Bolt’s Load Records, as a member of Warp Records’ legendary Seefeel, and performing with both projects across the world. Kiki Hitomi is a member of Ninja Tune / Hyperdub’s King Midas Sound (along with The Bug and Roger Robinson), and co-founded iconic Japanese dubstep-noise duo Dokkebi Q. She is also a celebrated illustrator and designer, having created artwork for countless record sleeves and brands. The combined interests, abilities and creative scope of the two musicians – both Japanese, both based in Germany – results in Essaka Hoisa, a brilliant explosion of noise that speaks volumes to their musical powers.

    Tracklist:

    1. Mum Tells Me
    2. Doggy Bag
    3. Itadakimasu
    4. Gift From God
    5. 3rd Eye
    6. GaGa
    7. Hototogisu
    8. Circle Of Life
    9. Warg
    10. Medicine Man

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